Institut für Molekulare Evolution

Welcome to the Institute of Molecular Evolution at Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf. Our main scientific interests are endosymbiosis, early evolution, the origin of life, cell evolution, genome evolution and compartmentalized energy metabolism with emphasis on chloroplasts, mitochondria, and hydrogenosomes.

News

22.07.2016 Graduation | Jan de Vries

Jan de Vries successfully finished his doctorate with the thesis entitled "Of robust kleptoplasts and versatile embryoplasts".


An interview with Bill Martin, whose interests are endosymbiosis, early evolution, and the origin of life.

Curr. Biol. 13:R515–R517 (2016)


Mitochondria, the cell cycle, and the origin of sex via a syncytial eukaryote common ancestor

Genome Biol. Evol. 8:1950–1970 (2016)

 


Energy for two: New archaeal lineages and the origin of mitochondria

Bioessays (2016)

doi: 10.1002/bies.201600089


Movie of the origin of life-theory developed by M.J. Russell and W.F. Martin

 

 


Movie of the symbiotic origin of eukaryotes-theory developed by W.F. Martin.


Sriram Garg wins the poster prize at the Gordon Research Seminar Mitochondria & Chloroplasts, Endosymbiotic Organelles: Biogenesis, Homeostasis, and Integration, June 1819 2016, Mount Snow, West Dover, Vermont (USA).

Title: Role of charge in organelle protein targeting evolution


The Trends in Microbiology cover image (Volume 24, Issue 7, 2016) depicts how endosymbiosis could have occurred with an alphaproteobacterium becoming engulfed by an ancient archaeon, forming the first eukaryotic endomembrane system. On pages 525–534, we propose that the origin of the eukaryotic endomembrane system was from bacterial outer membrane vesicles. Cover image and design by Debbie Maizels/Zoobotanica Scientific Illustration.


This is a video abstract of our paper "Bacterial vesicle secretion and the evolutionary origin of the eukaryotic endomembrane system" in Trends in Microbiology (24:525–534, 2016) where we propose that the eukaryotic endomembrane system originated from bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by the mitochondrial ancestor within the cytosol of its archaeal host at eukaryote origin. Confined within the host's cytosol, OMVs accumulated naturally, fusing either with each other or with the host's plasma membrane. This matched the host's archaeal secretory pathway for cotranslational protein insertion with outward bound mitochondrial-derived vesicles consisting of bacterial lipids, forging a primordial, secretory endoplasmic reticulum as the cornerstone of the eukaryotic endomembrane system.


The Trends in Plant Science cover image (Volume 21, Issue 6, 2016) depicts the terrestrialization by fresh-water algae. Key steps in evolution are often singularities. The emergence of land plants is one such case and it is not immediately apparent why. A recent analysis found the zygnematophycean algae to represent the closest relative to embryophytes. Intriguingly, many exaptations thought essential to conquer land are common among various streptophytes, but zygnematophycean algae share with land plants the transfer of a few plastid genes to the nucleus. On pages 467–476 Sven B. Gould and colleagues discuss how the streptophyte chloroplast evolved into what we refer to as the embryoplast, and argue this was as important for terrestrialization by fresh-water algae as the host cell-associated exaptations that are most often focused on. Cover image created by Sven B. Gould with support from Debbie Maizels.


Welt am Sonntag (German for World on Sunday), a German Sunday newspaper, published an article about Bill Martin and his research on the origin of life.


Dr. Shijulal Nelson-Sathi is this year's winner of the € 10,000 Karl-Arnold-Prize of the Northrhine-Westphalian Academy of Sciences, Humanities and the Arts.


Rheinische Post, a major German regional daily newspaper, published an article about Shijulal Nelson-Sathi, his research on prokaryotic genomes and the Karl-Arnold-Prize awarded to him.


23.07.2015 Award | William F. Martin

The European Union will support Prof. Dr. William F. Martin with around 2.4 million euros in the next five years. He was awarded the highly prestigious Advanced Grant in 2014 of the European Research Council (ERC). These Advanced Grants are awarded in a very strict selection process only to established, successful top researchers and are therefore considered a special scientific award. The special award to receive an ERC Advanced Grant, is also documented by the success rate: They fell at the current bid by approximately 4% to less than 8%.


Institutsleitung

Prof. Dr. William F. Martin

Molekulare Evolution
Heinrich-Heine-Universität
Düsseldorf
Universitätsstraße 1
Gebäude: 26.13
Etage/Raum: 01.34
Tel.: +49 211 81-13011
Fax: +49 211 81-13554

Sekretariat

Doris Matthée

Gebäude: 26.13
Etage/Raum: 01.36
Tel.: +49 211 81-14932
Fax: +49 211 81-13554
Verantwortlich für den Inhalt: E-Mail sendenProf. Dr. William F. Martin